Tag Archives: workaholism

New publication on individual job crafting and well-being

This study investigated how various types of employee well-being (i.e., work engagement, job satisfaction, burnout, and workaholism), may differently predict various job crafting behaviors (i.e., increasing structural and social resources and challenging demands, and decreasing hindering demands) and each other over time. A At Time 1, employee well-being was measured, and 4 years later job […]

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New publication on overwork, workaholism and work engagement

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether employees’ tendency to work excessive hours is motivated by the perception of a work environment that encourages overwork (overwork climate). Thus, this study introduces a self-report questionnaire aimed at assessing the perception of a psychological climate for overwork in the workplace. In Study 1 (N = […]

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New cross-national publication on the factorial validity of the DUWAS-10

The present study investigated the factor structure of the 10-item version of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS). The DUWAS-10 is intended to measure workaholism with two correlated factors: working excessively (WE) and working compulsively (WC). The factor structure of the DUWAS-10 was examined among multi-occupational samples from the Netherlands (n=9,010) and Finland (n=4,567) using […]

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New publication: Are workaholics born or made?

This study explores whether the interaction between the perception of an overwork climate in the workplace and person characteristics (i.e., achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, self-efficacy) may foster workaholism. Our results showed indeed that a work work climate that promotes overwork may foster workaholism, but especially for those high in achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, and self-efficacy […]

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New publication on workaholism and work engagement

A two-year follow-up study among Japanese workers revealed that work engagement predicted positive changes in health, life satisfaction, and performance, whereas workaholism predicted poor health and dissatisfaction. Moreover, workaholism was not related to future job performance (read more).

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New publication on cultural differences in work engagement and workaholism

This article compared the mean levels of work engagement and workaholism across two cultures:  East Asia (China and Japan) and Western Europe (Finland ,Netherlands and  Spain). Following this lead, it was hypothesized and found that Western European employees were more engaged at work than East Asian employees. Support for the second hypothesis that East Asian […]

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New publication on psychological needs, engagement and workaholism (in Dutch)

This study showed that – among 275 health care employees in the Netherlands –satisfaction of the psychological needs for autonomy and relatedness was associated  with work engagement, whereas failure to satisfy the psychological needs for autonomy and competence was associated with workaholism. In their turn, work engagement and workaholism were positively related to extra-role performance, […]

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New publication on the motivation of engagement and workaholism

The beauty versus the beast: On the motives of engaged and workaholic employees This chapter explores the motivational differences between two forms of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement, respectively. Theory and research on these two forms of heavy work investment is discussed from two perspectives: a personality trait perspective, in which the motivational […]

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New publication: Engaged managers are not workaholics

This study among Finnish managers showed that work engagement and workaholism did not correlate with each other, thereby suggesting that they are independent constructs. Moreover, longitudinal analyses revealed four different groups: 1) those with high initial but decreasing engagement and low but stable workaholism levels (18%), 2) those with low initial but increasing engagement and […]

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New publication on Workaholism

Workaholism is commonly conceptualized as a compulsive inner drive to work excessively hard. This study investigates to what extent rigid personal beliefs—i.e., performance-based self-esteem (self-esteem that is contingent upon good performance) and an enough continuation rule (continuing with work until one feels one has done enough)—contribute to exhaustion through workaholism. To examine these potential antecedents […]

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