Tag: workaholism

New article on workahoilism and engagement

Virtually all studies on workaholism and engagement rely on self-report questionnaires. However, the limitations of self-reports are widely acknowledged and potentially peer ratings may overcome these imitations. Using a sample of 73 dyads composed of focal workers and their colleagues, the present study aimed: (1) to compare focal workers’ and coworkers’ perceptions of work engagement […]

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New publication about wellbeing and job crafting

This study among 1,877 Finnish dentists investigates how various types of employee well-being (i.e., work engagement, job satisfaction, burnout, and workaholism), may differently predict various job crafting behaviors (i.e., increasing structural and social resources and challenging demands, and decreasing hindering demands) over a time-span of 4 years. The results showed that (a) work engagement positively […]

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New Publication on workaholism and irrational beliefs

  This study investigates the role of irrational beliefs at work in two Italian samples. The first aim was to evaluate the psychometric properties of an Italian adaptation of the Work-related Irrational Beliefs Questionnaire (WIB-Q; Van Wijhe, Peeters, & Schaufeli, 2013). The four-factor structure (i.e., performance demands, coworkers’ approval, failure, and control) was confirmed and […]

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New publication on individual job crafting and well-being

This study investigated how various types of employee well-being (i.e., work engagement, job satisfaction, burnout, and workaholism), may differently predict various job crafting behaviors (i.e., increasing structural and social resources and challenging demands, and decreasing hindering demands) and each other over time. A At Time 1, employee well-being was measured, and 4 years later job […]

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New publication on overwork, workaholism and work engagement

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether employees’ tendency to work excessive hours is motivated by the perception of a work environment that encourages overwork (overwork climate). Thus, this study introduces a self-report questionnaire aimed at assessing the perception of a psychological climate for overwork in the workplace. In Study 1 (N = […]

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New cross-national publication on the factorial validity of the DUWAS-10

The present study investigated the factor structure of the 10-item version of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS). The DUWAS-10 is intended to measure workaholism with two correlated factors: working excessively (WE) and working compulsively (WC). The factor structure of the DUWAS-10 was examined among multi-occupational samples from the Netherlands (n=9,010) and Finland (n=4,567) using […]

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New publication: Are workaholics born or made?

This study explores whether the interaction between the perception of an overwork climate in the workplace and person characteristics (i.e., achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, self-efficacy) may foster workaholism. Our results showed indeed that a work work climate that promotes overwork may foster workaholism, but especially for those high in achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, and self-efficacy […]

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New publication on workaholism and work engagement

A two-year follow-up study among Japanese workers revealed that work engagement predicted positive changes in health, life satisfaction, and performance, whereas workaholism predicted poor health and dissatisfaction. Moreover, workaholism was not related to future job performance (read more).

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New publication on cultural differences in work engagement and workaholism

This article compared the mean levels of work engagement and workaholism across two cultures:  East Asia (China and Japan) and Western Europe (Finland ,Netherlands and  Spain). Following this lead, it was hypothesized and found that Western European employees were more engaged at work than East Asian employees. Support for the second hypothesis that East Asian […]

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New publication on psychological needs, engagement and workaholism (in Dutch)

This study showed that – among 275 health care employees in the Netherlands –satisfaction of the psychological needs for autonomy and relatedness was associated  with work engagement, whereas failure to satisfy the psychological needs for autonomy and competence was associated with workaholism. In their turn, work engagement and workaholism were positively related to extra-role performance, […]

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