Author: Wilmar Schaufeli

Editorial on burnout

Recently, a consensual definition of burnout was proposed by an international expert panel that reads: “In a worker, occupational burnout or occupational physical AND emotional exhaustion state is an exhaustion due to prolonged exposure to work-related problems.” In an editorial I criticize this definition and conclude that the burnout enigma still remains unresolved (download the […]

Read More

New article on disengaging leadership

The main goal of this study was to develop a scale for measuring Disengaging Leadership (DEL) behaviors and to provide preliminary evidence for its validity. Developing such new measures is needed given current concepts that tap into negative leadership behaviors are rarely based on a sound theoretical framework. Drawing on the core premises of Self […]

Read More

New article on leadership and safety behavior

Safety behavior is the most critical task for air traffic controllers and other air traffic safety (ATS) employees. The literature shows that one of the main antecedents for ensuring safety is leadership. Yet, the understanding of leadership within air traffic control (ATC) is very limited. Drawing on both social learning theory and social exchange theory, […]

Read More

New theoretical article on leadership and engagement

Construct proliferation in the leadership field raises questions concerning parsimony and whether we should focus on joint mechanisms of leadership styles, rather than the differences between them. In this theoretical research article, we propose that positive leadership styles translate into similar leader behaviors on the work floor that influence employee work engagement through a number […]

Read More

New article on Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)

This article [in Dutch] focuses on the development and psychometric evaluation of a new burnout instrument: The Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT). Based on a theoretical analysis, an overview of existing burnout instruments and in-depth interviews with professionals, a new conceptualization of burnout has been developed. This serves as the basis for the BAT that consists […]

Read More

New article on organizational change and work engagement

This multi-wave, multi-source study focuses on the benefits of work engagement for employee adaptation to organizational change. The change entailed the implementation of a flexible office design in an engineering firm, which caused radical change for employees. The hypothesized process was that initial employee meaning-making will facilitate work engagement, which, in turn, predicts supervisor-rated adaptive […]

Read More

New publication on new burnout questionnaire (BAT)

This paper introduces a new definition for burnout and investigates the psychometric properties of the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT), which is based on that definition. In a prior qualitative study, 49 practitioners were interviewed about their conceptualization of burnout (part 1). Using a dialectical approach, four core dimensions—exhaustion, mental distance, and impaired emotional and cognitive […]

Read More

New Publication on the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)

Burnout as a concept indicative of a work-related state of mental exhaustion is recognized around the globe. Although the Maslach Burnout Inventory is by far the most frequently used questionnaire for assessing burnout, it is associated with several shortcomings and has been criticized on theoretical as well as empirical grounds. Thus, there is a need […]

Read More

New article on heavy work investment

The academic literature has drawn a clear distinction between a positive form (i.e., work engagement) and a negative form (i.e., workaholism) of heavy work investment (HWI). Nevertheless, the weight of individual and situational factors contributing to their development was not thoroughly explored. This study aims to investigate simultaneously the role of person factors (i.e., obsessive–compulsive […]

Read More

New article on engaging leadership

The current study investigates the mediating role of job resources (JRs) (i.e. person-job fit, value congruence, alignment, job control, use of skills, participation in decision-making, coworker support and performance feedback) and basic psychological need satisfaction at work (i.e. autonomy, relatedness, competence and meaningfulness) in the relationship between engaging leadership (EL) (i.e. inspiring, strengthening, empowering and […]

Read More