Author: Wilmar Schaufeli

New publication on workaholism

This study is about working conditions, sleep and health in Norwegian nurses (N = 1,781). Eight negative, work-related incidents were assesses such as dozing off at work, dosing while driving, harming or nearly harming one-self and/or patients and harming or nearly harming equipment. Young age, male sex, not living with children, low percentage of full-time […]

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New publication on engagement, health and performance

Most studies report a positive relationship of work engagement with health and job performance, but, occasionally, a “dark side of engagement” has also been uncovered. The current longitudinal study among 1,967 Japanese employees confirmed that work engagement has a curvilinear relation with psychological distress. At low levels of engagement a favorable effect was found, but […]

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New publication on burnout and the role of managing negative emotions

This study investigates emotional self-efficacy beliefs in managing negative emotions at work as a key mechanism that mediates the negative relationship between emotional stability – a trait highly associated with positive affect and mental health – and job burnout. To test this assertion, a two-wave study using a representative sample of 416 new military cadets […]

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New publication on measuring workaholism in Brazil

Workaholism is characterized by a state of mind in which employees work excessively and compulsively. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of two versions of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS-16 and DUWAS 10) among 571 workers in Brazil. A confirmatory factor analysis CFA of the DUWAS-16 confirmed the two factor structure (Working […]

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New study on burnout across Europe

This study uncovers relationships between burnout at country level on the one hand, and a variety of national economic, governance, and cultural indicators on the other hand. Burnout data were used from the 6th European Working Conditions Survey (2015) that includes random samples of workers from thirty-five European countries (total N=43,675). The countries with the […]

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Nieuw overzichtsartikel over burn-out

Er wordt van alles en nog wat over burn-out beweerd. Maar wat klopt er nu wel en wat klopt er niet? Wat zijn de feiten en wat is fictie? Dit artikel komt voort uit twee gemoedstoestanden: irritatie over allerlei uitspraken over burn-out waar geen wetenschappelijke evidentie voor is en verbazing over het feit dat de […]

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New publication on mental health related long-term sickness

Which job demands and job resources were predictive of mental health-related long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in nurses? It appeared that in random sample of Norwegian nurses (N = 1,533) 103 (7%) of them had mental health-related LTSA during 2-year follow-up. Harassment was positively and social support at the workplace was negatively related to mental health […]

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New publication on work engagement and performance

Previous studies have confirmed correlations between resilience and job performance, but surprisingly little is known about the nature of this relationship. This study among Czech workers in helping professions (N = 360) sheds light on the roles of two important positive dimensions of work-related well-being: job satisfaction and work engagement. Levels of resilience and perceived […]

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New article on workahoilism and engagement

Virtually all studies on workaholism and engagement rely on self-report questionnaires. However, the limitations of self-reports are widely acknowledged and potentially peer ratings may overcome these imitations. Using a sample of 73 dyads composed of focal workers and their colleagues, the present study aimed: (1) to compare focal workers’ and coworkers’ perceptions of work engagement […]

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